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Is The Celery Juice Trend Worth The Hype?

Is The Celery Juice Trend Worth The Hype?

Bye kale, hello celery? Showing up on your Instagram feed, at your local cafe and being endorsed by big name celebrities including the likes of Kim Kardashian, Gwyneth Paltrow and Naomi Campbell, there is no doubt that celery juice has taken the title of the first major diet trend for 2019.

The ‘wellness elixir’, as it has been dubbed, is said to help with nearly everything, from mental health and diabetes to skin conditions, celiac disease and even fertility problems. So is it worth the hype? Who is behind it? And will celery really cure all your ailments? Nutritionist Tracie Connor weighs in.

The trend can be traced back to Anthony William, New York bestselling author and the man behind the website Medical Medium. William, who has proudly labelled himself as the ‘Originator of Global Celery Juice Movement’ on his website, advises his readers to drink 16 ounces (approximately 473mL) of fresh celery juice on an empty stomach each day in order to reap the life-changing benefits.

While there is no doubt that drinking glasses of a vegetable that is 95% water is pretty damn hydrating, as it turns out, there is little scientific evidence on celery’s health benefits. “There's not enough research to back his claims. Celery is a very nutritious vegetable and I’m confident that it could boost health in many ways, but his claims are hefty, so more research needs to be done to confirm or deny it,” Tracie says.

According to Tracie, the most common benefits aligned with celery juice are hydration, antioxidants and fibrous, but in comparison to other vegetables and juices, it isn’t a particular standout.

Thousands of followers of the trend have also expressed their support on social media, claiming that the juice has boosted their energy levels and aided weight loss. But Tracie finds it hard to see why people are seeing these benefits, “Did these people include other healthy lifestyle changes at the same time as adding celery juice to see these results?”

While William has advocated for the juice for years, it appears his most recent book that was released in October could have something to do with the recent spike in interest. But with no formal qualifications, a lengthy disclaimer and no citations or sources to back up his assertions, William’s claims of the drink being a ‘savior when it comes to chronic illness’ is pretty unlikely.

So what should you do instead? Tracie recommends steering clear of diet trends altogether. “I highly recommend that people focus their attention on enjoying a healthy, balanced diet and lifestyle. If that isn't working, please speak to an accredited nutritionist for advice and share the accountability with them for any steps you're interested to take to better your health, including adding juices, supplements or dietary aids.”

So will celery’s it status remain?

 

Tracie Connor is a Brisbane based accredited nutritionist with over 10 years experience in the industry. You can visit her at www.tracietalkshealth.com.au.


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